ARPA Funding

How Nonprofits Can Access ARPA Funding 

The Minnesota Council of Nonprofits (MCN) is here to support nonprofits seeking American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funding as well as advocating on your behalf with state and local government (to learn more about our advocacy and public policy priorities, visit www.minnesotanonprofits.org/public-policy).

As part of the bill signed into law on March 11, 2021, ARPA distributed $8.5 billion towards Minnesota’s COVID-19 response and recovery, to be further allocated to the state, counties, and localities with expenditures allowable through 2026.

The resources below, along with upcoming educational workshops, will help you decide whether to apply for ARPA funding available via federal, state, or local government grants and contracts. While MCN cannot guarantee that our listings of available funding will be comprehensive, we have also listed other resources that may help you do additional grants research.

MCN strongly recommends you subscribe to MCN’s Grants Alert to receive updates regarding funding opportunities, upcoming fundraising workshops, opportunities to advocate, new resources, and nonprofit news, as this will be a primary avenue for sharing ARPA funding updates and opportunities. 

claudia-raya-liJGb5bsVQU-unsplash (1)


Minnesota State & Local ARPA Grants

ARPA dollars are flowing through state agencies, tribal governments, and local units of government. 

Click the "Minnesota ARPA Funding Opportunities" button above to access a list of the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) grants available to nonprofits in Minnesota of which we are aware. MCN will continue to share opportunities at the state and local level as they become available. We encourage you to do additional research.

Funders, please share your funding opportunity with us by emailing grants@minnesotanonprofits.org so we can help spread the word.

Nonprofits, read below for additional information and guidance regarding how to explore ARPA funding opportunities.

Commonly Asked Questions about ARPA

The purpose of the American Rescue Plan Act  - often referred to as “ARP” or “ARPA” - is to provide fast and direct economic assistance for American workers, families, small businesses, and industries.

The American Rescue Plan continues many of the programs started by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act of 2020 and Consolidated Appropriations Act (2021) by adding new phases, new allocations, and new guidance to address issues related to the continuation of the COVID-19 pandemic. Generally speaking, ARPA funding has a longer timeframe for planning, implementation and spending than initial relief programs allowed. ARPA creates a variety of new programs to address continuing pandemic-related recovery as the United States begins to emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic.
The American Rescue Plan was passed by Congress on March 10, 2021 and signed into law on March 11, 2021.

How much funding is coming into Minnesota, and who is responsible for it? Minnesota was allocated $8.5 billion of Fiscal Recovery Funds, divided into three categories:

  • $2.8 billion in flexible aid to the state (the State Fiscal Recovery Fund);
  • $2.1 billion in flexible aid to local governments (Local Fiscal Recovery Fund); and
  • $3.5 billion in program-specific federal funding.

For more information about the State Fiscal Recovery Fund and program-specific federal funding, please refer to the Minnesota Department of Administration’s website: American Rescue Plan / Minnesota Management and Budget (MMB) (mn.gov) and this blog from the Minnesota Budget Project: ReportDetails (mnbudgetproject.org)

A fact sheet published by the US Department of Treasury provides a detailed description of these uses:

  1. Support public health expenditures, by, for example, funding COVID-19 mitigation efforts, medical expenses, behavioral healthcare, and certain public health and safety staff;
  2. Address negative economic impacts caused by the public health emergency, including economic harms to workers, households, small businesses, impacted industries, and the public sector;
  3. Replace lost public sector revenue, using this funding to provide government services to the extent of the reduction in revenue experienced due to the pandemic;
  4. Provide premium pay for essential workers, offering additional support to those who have and will bear the greatest health risks because of their service in critical infrastructure sectors; or
  5. Invest in water, sewer, and broadband infrastructure, making necessary investments to improve access to clean drinking water, support vital wastewater and stormwater infrastructure, and to expand access to broadband Internet.

Local governments - Counties, Cities, Towns/Townships as well as Tribal Governments - are receiving funding in two allocations; the first was distributed in May of 2021 and the second will come in the summer of 2022. Entities receiving funding have from March 2021 through December 2024 to obligate funding; expenditures must be concluded by December 31, 2026.

While there is nothing that requires local units of government to contract with community-based organizations to provide services, initial findings show that many have done so, are planning to do so, or are considering doing so.

Some local governments have fully developed strategies for the usage of ARP funds, but others were waiting until the final rules were released by Department of Treasury (published in January 2022) and are now moving forward; still others are holding out until full allocations (round one and two) are in-hand to roll out a comprehensive plan.

In addition to the money directly allocated to Minnesota’s Local Units of Government, there are federal competitive grants still in process for which various entities in Minnesota have applied. Many of these grants require community partnerships which may present opportunities for nonprofit organizations to partner as subrecipients of the funding, should it be awarded to any of the Minnesota applicants.

Click the button below to access a list of the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) grants available to nonprofits in Minnesota of which we are aware. MCN will continue to share opportunities at the state and local level as they become available. We encourage you to do additional research.

Minnesota ARPA Funding Opportunities

While some local units of government have websites dedicated to ARPA and their plans for utilizing the dollars, many do not. To find out how much funding a local unit of government received, click on this spreadsheet (link to same spreadsheet as above). All ARPA funding recipients had to provide a mandatory report to the US Department of Treasury in April of 2022; it is anticipated that those reports will be posted here when available: Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds | U.S. Department of the Treasury

Greater MSP is also tracking decision making of local governments in the metro area. You can find more information here: https://www.mspfederalfundinghub.org/arpatracker

Sources: 

Federal ARPA Grants

Selected Federal Grants:

Where to do additional research on federal grant and contracting opportunities:


Webinar Recording - ARPA Funding and Potential Opportunities for Minnesota Nonprofits

On July 14, MCN hosted an information session designed to help Minnesota nonprofits learn more about funding opportunities that are or may be available from federal ARPA dollars, including an overview of ARPA itself, the three types of support ARPA is offering in Minnesota, and how nonprofit can best learning about funding that fits their organization's needs.

Watch Webinar

Download Webinar Slides


Grantwriting Education and Networking

MCN has general resources available on grant writing and regularly offers workshops to help nonprofit professionals hone their skills. Upcoming events include:

Beginner Grantseeking, $89 MCN members / $129 nonmembers

Intermediate Grantwriting, $89 MCN members / $129 nonmembers

Beginner Grantwriting, $89 MCN members / $129 nonmembers

Grantwriters Incubator, FREE

Other Resources:


This resource was made possible with the assistance of the Nonprofit Association of Washington and the Foraker Group, and through the generous support of:

McKnight Foundation logo